Labios de churrasco

V' 15

Labios de churrasco

Raúl Perrone
Argentinien, 1994
61min, OmeU

© Viennale © Viennale

Labios de churrasco

Raúl Perrone
Argentinien, 1994
, 61min, OmeU

Cast: 
Fabián Vena
Violeta Naón
Gustavo Prone
Carlos Briolotti
Fernando Álvarez
Gigí de la Mota
Gustavo Aldana
Screenplay: 
Raúl Perrone
Camera: 
Carlos Briolotti
Editor: 
Luis Barros
Composer: 
Los Caballeros de la Quema

Production: 
Les Envies que je te desire
World Sales: 
Les Envies que je te desire
Format: 
BetaSP
Black/White

This is an emblematic film because it became, unwittingly, the founding work of the new independent Argentinean cinema, before Martín Rejtman’s RAPADO and Adrián Caetano’s PIZZA, BIRRA, FASO. The opening title – “Ituzaingó, 1994” – is much more than a mere timespace definition for the movie; rather, it represents the invention of a symbolic filmic territory which would last throughout Perrone’s work. Streets, houses, public squares, a video store and a newsstand are the roaming places for the youngsters – creatures trapped inside an eternal present devoid of any projects – portrayed in this profile of a neighborhood. The protagonists’ social and political disenfranchisement is as blatant as the deep sense of friendship that protects them. The recurring use of iris shots, an obsession with the sky over Ituzaingó, and a peculiar way to understand the relation between spaces and emotional life are already present in this early, groundbreaking work. A filmmaker and a surveyor, Perrone had to measure and trace first the limits of Ituzaingó in order to know how to film it in forthcoming years.

In the presence of Pablo Ratto (producer).

Raúl Perrone
Born in 1952 in Ituzaingó, Argentina. The “father” of independent Argentinean cinema makes most of his films in (and on the subject of) this small city fifteen kilometers away from Buenos Aires. In almost 28 years, he directs over 40 films without any external financial support. His first “Barrio” films, closer to a naturalistic style and based on words, have little to do with the experimental, formal sophistication of his later works in which words remain beyond the frame and (facial) expressions reach a hyperbolic dimension. These are tales about neighbors and friends, about love, ominous tales set in an imaginary jungle, or in a castle. The multiplicity of themes is just as evident as the aesthetic drive of a filmmaker who reinvents, film after film, cinema’s language. He lives in Ituzaingó. (Roger Koza)