Crime Wave

V'18

Crime Wave

André De Toth
USA, 1954
74min, OF

Bild: Sammlung Österreichisches Filmmuseum

Crime Wave

André De Toth
USA, 1954
, 74min, OF

Mit: 
Sterling Hayden
Gene Nelson
Phyllis Kirk
Ted de Corsia
Charles Buchinsky (Bronson)
Jay Novello
Nedrick Young
Drehbuch: 
Crane Wilbur
Bernard Gordon
Richard Wormser
John Hawkins
Ward Hawkins
Kamera: 
Bert Glennon
Musik: 
David Buttolph

Produktion: 
Warner Bros.
Format: 
16 mm
Schwarz/Weiß

Nach einem missglückten Überfall erpresst eine Bande ein ehemaliges Mitglied, das längst geläutert und glücklich verheiratet ist. Sie verstecken sich in seinem Haus, dann zwingen sie ihn, mit seiner Frau als Geisel, als Fluchtfahrer bei ihrem nächsten Banküberfall mitzumachen. Ein makellos mitleidloses B-Picture-Meisterstück, tiefschwarz in Pessimismus und Szenerie: Fast alle Szenen spielen bei Nacht. André De Toth, in Österreich-Ungarn geborener Auteur unprätentiöser Hollywood-Genreperlen, inszeniert im realistischen Noir-Stil, verleiht der Action aber mit expressionistischen Effekten (s)einen unverwechselbaren paranoiden Drall.

Mit PLUNDER ROAD

 

One of the great Hollywood films by the two-fisted and one- eye Hungarian émigré director André de Toth, CRIME WAVE is a brisk cops-and-robber caper that exemplifies the lean economy, expressive style and dark sense of embittered injustice shared by his Westerns and crime films of the late 1940s and 1950s. When de Toth rejected Jack Warner’s choice of Humphrey Bogart and Ava Gardner as leads, the mogul angrily cut both budget and production schedule in half but reluctantly allowed de Toth to cast Sterling Hayden as the film’s anti-hero, a tough cop leaning hard on a parolee who he suspects, almost correctly, of covering for a dangerous band of robbers recently escaped from the pen. Little does Hayden know that the crooks are hiding in plain sight, holed up in the cold water flat of the hapless parolee and his young wife who they hold hostage and force to join a recklessly audacious heist. Master cinematographer Bert Glennon made it possible for de Toth to shoot quite daring, for the time, extended night scenes on location, allowing the film to dramatically extend the neo-realist style popular in post-WW2 crime dramas.

With PLUNDER ROAD