OSôSHIKI

V'03

OSôSHIKI

Die Beerdigungszeremonie

Itami Jûzô
Japan, 1984
124min, OmeU

OSôSHIKI

Itami Jûzô
Japan, 1984
, 124min, OmeU

Cast: 
Miyamoto Nobuko
Amamiya Chizuko
Yamazaki Tsutomu
Inoue Tasuke
Sugai Kin
Amamiya Kikue
Takase Haruna
Ryôko
Ôtaki Hideji
Shôkichi
Zaitsu Ichirô
Satomi
Bitô Isao
Shigeru
Kishibe Ittoku
Akira
Kobayashi Kaoru
Inose
Ryû Chishû
Priester
Takase Haruna
Saitô Yoshiko
Tsugawa Masahiko
Kimura
Tsumura Takashi
Aoki
Yokoyama Michiyo
Frau Kimura
Yuri Chikako
Ayako
Edoya Nekohachi
Ebihara
Okumura Kiminobu
Amamiya Shinkichi
Nishikawa Hikaru
Frau Hanamura
Ebina Midori
Kiyochan
Seki Hiroko
Zeremonienberaterin
Yoshikawa Mitsuko
alte Frau
Tanaka Haruo
alter Mann
Fujiwara Kamatari
kleiner alter Mann
Kagawa Ryôsuke
Vorsitzender des Altenclubs
Sano Asao
Kurozaki
Sekiyama Kôji
Okumura
der auf Bäume klettert)

Production: 
New Century Producers, Itami Production
World Sales: 
Distribution in Austria: 
35mm/1:1,33/Farbe

If you pay more attention to such details as the dark shadow falling on the funeral operator, or sunshine filtering through foliage reflected on a young womans neckline, maybe that «something» reveals itself unexpectedly. But while you are busy enjoying, the story develops quickly before you know it. Its a wicked film, indeed. This wickedness resembles Spielberg. At the end of <i>Close Encounters of the Third Kind</i>, the descending huge mothership abruptly starts rotating and reverses the sky and the earth. Similarly, <i>Osôshiki</i> does have such a strong surprise to make one doubt ones eyes, and the very moving scene is giving an extraordinary aura to the film. Needless to say, it is the scene in what appears an empty lot in the grove where all the attendees gather and listen to the speeches of the relatives. No one dares to move. No actor or actress exposes his/her character on display. Only the camera keeps panning slowly, and in the unfolding 360-degree field of vision, you feel the air flowing out of nowhere and clinging to every single one of the attendees. We cannot actually see it nor say it is on the screen somewhere, but it apparently exists. It is something people cannot do anything about, except for standing still in the presence of it. It seems to me that the most suitable word to describe it is «secret». I would say it is the secret of a film.
(Kurosawa Kiyoshi, in «Kinema Junpô», No. 898, 1984/11II)