Björk - Biophilia Live

V'14

Björk - Biophilia Live

Nick Fenton, Peter Strickland
GB, 2014
Documentaries, 97min, OF

© 2014 Image courtesy of Wellhart/One Little Indian © 2013 Saga Sig Image courtesy of Wellhart/One Little Indian © 2011 Inez and Vinoodh Image courtesy of Wellhart/One Little Indian

Björk - Biophilia Live

Nick Fenton, Peter Strickland
GB, 2014
Documentaries, 97min, OF

Cast: 
Björk
Matt Robertson
Manu Delago
Graduale Nobili
Sound: 
Björk
Addi 800
Camera: 
Brett Turnbull
Editor: 
Nick Fenton
Composer: 
Björk
Costume: 
Iris van Herpen
Production: 
Gloria Films, One Little Indian, The Wellcome Trust
World Sales: 
Cinema Purgatorio
Format: 
DCP
Color

A voiceover by Sir David Attenborough starts the show, guiding us through the app-based concept album, which explores the relationship between music, nature and technology. The ambitious idea is matched by in-the-round staging that gives this aircraft hangar-like venue the intimacy of a theatre. An octagon of flatscreen TVs hover above a platform where Graduale Nobili, a 24-voices strong, all-female Icelandic choir wear self-conscious smiles and unflattering hooded tunics. Huddled around a central Tesla coil, they look like a cult imagined by Sofia Coppola, but sound wonderful as their voices soar over Óskasteinar.
When Björk appears, she doesn’t look much older than the fresh-faced teens, despite being 48. What sets her apart – aside from the huge, pastel-hued afro wig and a dress that looks like a lumpy pupa – is her boundless capacity to perform. Bouncing on her heels, her voice picks up on each twinkling tremor of “Moon” and every shuddering beat within “Crystalline”, her hands moving and head twitching in sync. (Betty Clarke)

In the presence of Peter Strickland.