TROP TOT, TROP TARD

V'10

TROP TOT, TROP TARD

Zu früh, zu spät

Danièle Huillet, Jean-Marie Straub
F/Ägypten, 1981
105min, dOF

TROP TOT, TROP TARD

Danièle Huillet, Jean-Marie Straub
F/Ägypten, 1981
, 105min, dOF

Cast: 
Stimme
Danièle Huillet (Teil A)
Stimme
Bhagat el Nadi (Teil B)
Screenplay: 
Jean-Marie Straub
Danièle Huillet
Sound: 
Louis Hochet
Manfred Blank
Camera: 
William Lubtchansky
Caroline Champetier (Frankreich); Robert Alazraki
Marguerite Perlado (Ägypten)
Editor: 
Jean-Marie Straub
Danièle Huillet

Production: 
Jean-Marie Straub, Danièle Huillet
Format: 
16 mm
Color

Opening upon one of the most memorable shots ever filmed, Trop tôt, trop tard is an essay on the often tentative, yet urgent conditions of revolution. Shot in France and Egypt, the film employs a diptych structure as it attempts to (quite literally) catch the wind of past revolutions, using the writings of Friedrich Engels and Mahmoud Hussein. Shooting first in the busy roundabout of Paris’s storied Place de la Bastille, then in the outlying countryside where the seeds of revolution were once sewn, Straub and Huillet describe how the French peasants revolted “too early” and succeeded “too late”. Alongside landscapes shot near the Nile and its delta, an Arab intellectual relates the history of the peasant resistance during the occupation by the British, who similarly employed bad timing. Much has been written about the film’s ebb and flow structure, especially by Serge Daney, who observed its musical and “meteorological play not seen since the silent era. Trop tôt, trop tard is, to my knowledge, one of the rare films, since Sjöström, to have filmed the wind.”(Cinematheque Ontario)