Our Stars

V'15

Our Stars

Mark Rappaport
USA/F, 2015
27min, OF

© Viennale

Our Stars

Mark Rappaport
USA/F, 2015
, 27min, OF

Production: 
Mark Rappaport
World Sales: 
Mark Rappaport
Format: 
DCP
Color and Black/White

Anita Ekberg played the role of a movie star frequently before she became one herself. BECOMING ANITA EKBERG charts this transition, and its corollary: the move from breezy sex symbol to icy sex goddess. OUR STARS traces a sequence of classic romantic onscreen pairings that were initiated in the 40’s and 50’s and then reprised in the following decades. The ill-fated reunions were doomed from the outset: movie romances hold their charge only when embalmed in time. By offering viewers a chance to see what comes later, these couples have unintentionally produced documentaries of time’s cruelty. THE CIRCLE CLOSES is an elegant meditation on the non-human objects at the center of four classic films. “Silent, uncomplaining witnesses to other people’s lives”, these atypical movie stars are surrogates not for the viewer, but the camera itself. (Colin Beckett)

In the presence of Mark Rappaport.

Mark Rappaport
Along with Martin Scorsese, James Benning, the Kuchar Brothers and Tweety Bird, Mark Rappaport was born in 1942. He entered the world at a moment when Hollywood cinema possessed an unrivaled cultural hegemony. Over the course of his adolescence, its grip on the American popular imagination would be loosened by the coming of television and the breakup of the studio monopolies. By the time he began doing his own film work, he and the rest of his cohort – which would also include Laura Mulvey, Jim McBride, Thom Andersen, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Jonathan Rosenbaum, and Owen Land – had been cast as unavoidably self-conscious managers of the cinema’s “decline” into respectability. All of these figures staked their claim on the meaning of the movies, some as reformists, others as revolutionaries. Compared with the efforts of his peers, Rappaport’s meta-cinematic peregrinations have followed an oddly roundabout course. Neither brashly triumphal nor ruthlessly critical, Rappaport’s work has consistently achieved a wholly unsettling ambivalence.