pibas

V' 15

Las pibas

Raúl Perrone
Argentinien, 2012
65min, OmeU

© Viennale © Viennale

Las pibas

Raúl Perrone
Argentinien, 2012
, 65min, OmeU

Cast: 
Fiorella Yamina Aito
Yuliana Nerina Bustos
Nestor Gianotti
Santiago Deandreis
Amiliano Rios
Screenplay: 
Raúl Perrone
Sound: 
Mariano Pattini
Camera: 
Raúl Perrone
Editor: 
Raúl Perrone
Mariano Pattini
Composer: 
Florencia Rúiz

Production: 
Les Envies que je te désire, Trivial Media
World Sales: 
Trivial Media
Format: 
DCP
Color

Intimacy and repetition; these are the two conceptual axes over which this beautiful camera film evolves. Fixed open shots are the main resources used to follow a love relationship and the many moments when this liaison between two women – 22 and 24 years old – is recomposed. In particular, we get to see the mental adjustments of one of them, the one who survived a failed suicide attempt and who has to go to work in a factory every day. The reiterative lateral tracking shots used to follow this character, played by Fiorella Aito, on her way to the factory are the only camera movements used in the whole film. This is so because Perrone chooses a still form for registering the experience of labor and affection, two areas dominated by reiteration. And even though in one very accurate sequence gender-related violence appears off-screen, this is a film without sordidness. Rather, tenderness is the dominating tone which can be seen, specially, in the closing shots; only then, when the couple conjures up repetition, we get to see a close-up of these lovers’ faces. 

In the presence of Pablo Ratto (producer).

With SEM.

Raúl Perrone
Born in 1952 in Ituzaingó, Argentina. The “father” of independent Argentinean cinema makes most of his films in (and on the subject of) this small city fifteen kilometers away from Buenos Aires. In almost 28 years, he directs over 40 films without any external financial support. His first “Barrio” films, closer to a naturalistic style and based on words, have little to do with the experimental, formal sophistication of his later works in which words remain beyond the frame and (facial) expressions reach a hyperbolic dimension. These are tales about neighbors and friends, about love, ominous tales set in an imaginary jungle, or in a castle. The multiplicity of themes is just as evident as the aesthetic drive of a filmmaker who reinvents, film after film, cinema’s language. He lives in Ituzaingó. (Roger Koza)